The Best Encryption Software of 2016

...

The Electronic Frontier Foundation aims to protect Web traffic by encrypting the entire Internet using HTTPS. Chrome now puts a little warning marker in the Address Bar next to any non-secure HTTP address. Encryption is important, and not only for Web surfing. If you encrypt all of the sensitive documents on your desktop or laptop, a hacker or laptop thief won't be able to parley their possession into identity theft, bank account takeover, or worse. To help you select an encryption product that's right for your situation, we've rounded up a collection of current products. As we review more products in this area, we'll keep the list up to date.

When the FBI needed information from the San Bernardino shooter's iPhone, they asked Apple for a back door to get past the encryption. But no such back door existed, and Apple refused to create one. The FBI had to hire hackers to get into the phone.

Why wouldn't Apple help? Because the moment a back door or similar hack exists, it becomes a target, a prize for the bad guys. It will leak sooner or later. In a talk at Black Hat this past summer, Apple's Ivan Krstic revealed that the company has done something similar in their cryptographic servers. Once the fleet of servers is up and running, they physically destroy the keys that would permit modification. Apple can't update them, but the bad guys can't get in either.

All of the products in this roundup explicitly state that they have no back door, and that's as it should be. It does mean that if you encrypt an essential document and then forget the encryption password, you've lost it for good.

Back in the day, if you wanted to keep a document secret you could use a cipher to encrypt it and then burn the original. Or you could lock it up in a safe. The two main approaches in encryption utilities parallel these options.

One type of product simply processes files and folders, turning them into impenetrable encrypted versions of themselves. The other creates a virtual disk drive that, when open, acts like any other drive on your system. When you lock the virtual drive, all of the files you put into it are completely inaccessible.

Similar to the virtual drive solution, some products store your encrypted data in the cloud. This approach requires extreme care, obviously. Encrypted data in the cloud has a much bigger attack surface than encrypted data on your own PC.

Which is better? It really depends on how you plan to use encryption. If you're not sure, take advantage of the 30-day free trial offered by each of these products to get a feel for the different options.

After you copy a file into secure storage, or create an encrypted version of it, you absolutely need to wipe the unencrypted original. Just deleting it isn't sufficient, even if you bypass the Recycle Bin, because the data still exists on disk, and data recovery utilities can often get it back.

Some encryption products avoid this problem by encrypting the file in place, literally overwriting it on disk with an encrypted version. It's more common, though, to offer secure deletion as an option. If you choose a product that lacks this feature, you should find a free secure deletion tool to use along with it.

Overwriting data before deletion is sufficient to balk software-based recovery tools. Hardware-based forensic recovery works because the magnetic recording of data on a hard drive isn't actually digital. It's more of a waveform. In simple terms, the process involves nulling out the known data and reading around the edges of what's left. If you really think someone (the feds?) might use this technique to recover your incriminating files, you can set your secure deletion tool to make more passes, overwriting the data beyond what even these techniques can recover.

An encryption algorithm is like a black box. Dump a document, image, or other file into it, and you get back what seems like gibberish. Run that gibberish back through the box, with the same password, and you get back the original.

The U.S. government has settled on Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) as a standard, and all of the products gathered here support AES. Even those that support other algorithms tend to recommend using AES.

If you're an encryption expert, you may prefer another algorithm, Blowfish, perhaps, or the Soviet government's GOST. For the average user, however, AES is just fine.

Passwords are important, and you have to keep them secret, right? Well, not when you use Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) cryptography.

With PKI, you get two keys. One is public; you can share it with anyone, register it in a key exchange, tattoo it on your forehead—whatever you like. The other is private, and should be closely guarded. If I want to send you a secret document, I simply encrypt it with your public key. When you receive it, your private key decrypts it. Simple!

Using this system in reverse, you can create a digital signature that proves your document came from you and hasn't been modified. How? Just encrypt it with your private key. The fact that your public key decrypts it is all the proof you need. PKI support is less common than support for traditional symmetric algorithms.

If you want to share a file with someone and your encryption tool doesn't support PKI, there are other options for sharing. Many products allow creation of a self-decrypting executable file. You may also find that the recipient can use a free, decryption-only tool.

Right now there are three Editors' Choice products in the consumer-accessible encryption field. The first is the easiest to use of the bunch, the next is the most secure, and the third is the most comprehensive.

AxCrypt Premium has a sleek, modern look, and when it's active you'll hardly notice it. Files in its Secured Folders get encrypted automatically when you sign out, and it's one of the few that support public key cryptography.

CertainSafe Digital Safety Deposit Box goes through a multistage security handshake that authenticates you to the site and authenticates the site to you. Your files are encrypted, split into chunks, and tokenized. Then each chunk gets stored on a different server. A hacker who breached one server would get nothing useful.

Folder Lock can either encrypt files or simply lock them so nobody can access them. It also offers encrypted lockers for secure storage. Among its many other features are file shredding, free space shredding, secure online backup, and self-decrypting files.

The other products here also have their merits, too, of course. Read the capsules below and then click through to the full reviews to decide which one you'll use to protect your files. Have an opinion on one of the apps reviewed here, or a favorite tool we didn't mention? Let us know in the comments.

Categories
GAMES
0 Comment

Leave a Reply

Captcha image


RELATED BY

  • 5300c769af79e

    Google Project Fi Adds Three to Boost Speeds, Reach

    Which is why Google's Project Fi wireless service today expand its reach and boosted speeds.And the addition of UK mobile carrier Three to the mix promises speeds that are 10-20 times faster than before.
  • 5300c769af79e

    Next-Generation Endpoint Security Market Sizing and Forecast 2016-2020

    Download The Next-Generation Endpoint Security (NGES) market is most similar to the Endpoint Threat Detection and Response (EDR) market identified by Gartner, but also overlaps the Specialized Threat Analysis and Protection (STAP) market identified by IDC.It is contained within the broader endpoint software security market, which includes traditional antivirus, also identified by IDC, and the even larger endpoint security market identified by "MarketsandMarkets," which includes all of the previous functionalities plus firewall, endpoint device control, and more.
  • 5300c769af79e

    Jupiter: 2025 Before Driverless Vehicles Are Prevalent

    Jupiter Research tried to answer the question, given the experimentation with driverless vehicles, when will it gain traction?For that matter the electronic display systems of one driverless vehicle will very likely be connected to those of other vehicles.
  • 5300c769af79e

    Shadow IT: How To Avoid App Disasters

    IT professionals today are familiar with Shadow IT: business users empowered by no-code/low-code solutions to spin up apps to meet an immediate need.While these apps may help departments quickly solve a single problem, they can create considerable headaches for IT organizations.