Identify Home Energy Hogs With This MIT Sensor

...

Energy experts have long implored people to unplug electronic devices they aren't using to avoid "phantom power"—the energy a device consumes even when it's turned off.

But MIT researchers have now developed a sensor that can save you energy by doing the opposite: leave everything plugged in, and it will tell you which of your electronics (or anything else with a power plug) are using too much electricity.

Though it's currently just a concept, the sensor could be as easy to install as a light timer: no wires need to be disconnected, and the postage-stamp-sized device can be placed anywhere on an incoming power line.

"We're trying to lower the barriers to installation," researcher John Donnal said in a statement. "It just goes on with a zip tie."

Once installed, the sensor goes to work identifying the energy use of everything connected to the grid. Through extensive testing, the MIT team built a catalog of energy footprints for common household, industrial, and even military devices (the research was partly funded by the Office of Naval Research and some of the testing was conducted on board a US Coast Guard cutter). The extensive database will allow a single sensor to identify "signatures" of specific appliances.

MIT envisions that the sensor will be sold with an app that can tell users how much money they'll save by replacing energy-hogging devices with more efficient ones. Some of the energy use data will be sent to the cloud, but most will stay inside the home, reducing bandwidth demands.

Besides its ease of installation, perhaps the best part about this electricity sniffer is it won't require you to open your wallet wide just to save money in the future: researchers estimate the final purchase price to be around $30 once it goes into commercial production.

Categories
GAMES
0 Comment

Leave a Reply

Captcha image


RELATED BY

  • 5300c769af79e

    Here are Some of the Rumored Specs for an Upcoming HTC Nexus

    Back in April, we saw the first batch of reports surface with possible details of the upcoming Nexus phone or phones from Google.The initial rumors focused on codenames of Marlin and Sailfish as those representing two HTC phones that would take over Google’s Nexus program this year, but few other details accompanied those names.
  • 5300c769af79e

    Hands On: Farewell SIM Cards, Hello Virtual SIMs?

    KnowRoaming's SoftSIM, uCloudlink's CloudSIM, and Gemalto's embedded SIM all provide remote SIM provisioning and GSM connectivity without you ever having to physically put a SIM card into your phone.The phone is tricked into thinking it has a SIM card in the slot even though no hardware is involved.
  • 5300c769af79e

    Microsoft Word Flow Keyboard (for iPhone)

    Despite its disappointing market share, I remain a fan of the Windows 10 Mobile phone operating system, and one of my favorite things about it is the Word Flow keyboard.I didn't notice the former, but the latter holds true with the Word Flow Keyboard.
  • 5300c769af79e

    uHoo IoT Device Measures Indoor Air Toxins

    In Beijing, air quality is a matter of major concern to residents.The uHoo device, a small $99 concave cylinder samples the air to detect carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone, air pressure, volatile organic compounds, temperature, dust, and humidity, each through a dedicated sensor.