Adobe Lightroom for Android Update Adds Raw File Importing, Editing

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Today, Adobe pushed an update to Lightroom on Android, bringing with it raw image support while on mobile. That means importing directly from your camera, editing, sharing, etc. in a way you would from your computer.

In order to get your raw files over to Lightroom, Adobe recommends a on-the-go (OTG) cable or device, like the one we showed you yesterday from Amazon. Once camera and phone have been connected, you can transfer the raw files in PTP mode by selecting each within Lightroom. 

Adobe says that this new raw support gives you the same type of support that you’ll find on desktop, including:

The update appears to be live right now.

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