These May be the Nexus 2016 Wallpapers, Download Away

...

Google hasn’t even come close to showing off the new Nexus phone(s) for 2016, but that hasn’t stopped a slow trollout of leaks involving them. We’ve heard the specs, seen mock-up renders, and now have supposed wallpapers from the device that you can download.

The guys over at Android Police provided the fun today, saying that these are at least some of the wallpapers expected to be on board the new HTC-made Nexus phones when Google unveils them later this year, but that there may be more. Hey, I’m always down for new wallpapers.

You can grab all of the shared files at this link. Above and below, we’ve included some samples to let you know what you are about to get into.

Categories
E-COMMERCE
0 Comment

Leave a Reply

Captcha image


RELATED BY

  • 5300c769af79e

    Facebook Teases DeepText AI With 'Near-Human Accuracy'

    On Facebook, we routinely fire off dozens of posts and comments per week, with the assumption that the recipient will be able to decipher our messages.But what about Facebook's algorithm?
  • 5300c769af79e

    DEAL: All Samsung Gear S2 Models are $50 at Best Buy and Amazon

    How about one of Samsung’s Gear S2 models?As of today, the Gear S2 and Gear S2 Classic have been discounted by $50 at Best Buy and Amazon.
  • 5300c769af79e

    T-Mobile Adds 16 More Streaming Services to Binge On

    Heads up, T-Mobile customers: The Binge On perk is getting even better.The expansion includes ABC, Apple Music, Big Ten Network, Dish Anywhere, several Disney services (Disney Channel, Disney Jr, and Disney XD), Fox Now, FXNow, and Nat Geo TV, along with some lesser-known services, like Ceek VR, the sign language channel D-PAN.
  • 5300c769af79e

    Tech Industry Lambasts New FCC Privacy Rules

    The new rules are consistent with the Federal Trade Commission's privacy framework and the administration's Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights, the FCC said.The rules establish three approaches to information use and sharing: The FCC "did the right thing in distinguishing between sensitive and non-sensitive information," said John Simpson, Consumer Watchdog's privacy project director.