Airlines Can Stop Warning Passengers of Galaxy Note 7 Risk

...

The Federal Aviation Administration lifted its requirement for Galaxy Note 7 pre-boarding announcements by airlines.

As of Tuesday, passengers will no longer hear warnings about flying with the unstable device that's prone to explode.

Samsung permanently ended production of the Note 7 in October, after numerous reports of the handsets catching fire and exploding. The Department of Transportation followed suit, classifying the phone as hazardous material and banning it from carry-on and checked luggage.

Now, thanks to "exceptionally high rates of participation" in the nationwide recall program, and carriers' move to brick remaining devices, the USDOT no longer demands pre-flight guidance.

"Together with our wireless carriers, we have taken aggressive action to limit the remaining phones' ability to work as mobile devices, further enhancing participation in the recall," the Korean manufacturer said.

In August, reports surfaced of the Galaxy Note 7 overheating, burning users, and, in some cases, exploding. Samsung issued a global recall of 2.5 million devices, and later delivered to stores 500,000 new, "safer" phones, which proved just as risky.

But while the tech company apologized and offered customers refunds, it still hasn't addressed why the handsets caught on fire in the first place. Instead, quality assurance firm Instrumental gave it a try, suggesting in a December report that design flaws—not the phone's battery—are to blame.

A teardown revealed that the Note 7 has so little space between the battery and the rest of its components that slight pressure, such as sitting on the gadget in a back pocket, could cause the polymer separator layers that keep the battery safe to come in contact with each other, causing the battery to explode.

As of early November, 85 percent of all recalled Note 7 devices had been replaced. That number grew over the holiday season: "We've had over 96 percent of Galaxy Note 7 phones returned to date," Samsung said.

If you've given up your Galaxy phablet but still want a Samsung-branded phone in your pocket, our recommendation is the similar, but safe Galaxy S7 Edge.

Categories
APPLICATIONS
0 Comment

Leave a Reply

Captcha image


RELATED BY

  • 5300c769af79e

    ASUS Teases CES ZenFone Event With 'Explore the Unknown' Video

    In the video, we see two young children exploring the world around them, as well as a young man who oddly resembles Harry Potter who is recreating the solar system out of papier-mâché.Near the end, ASUS shows off the outline of a device, but we don’t really get a good look at it.
  • 5300c769af79e

    Scientists Can Sequence DNA With a Smartphone

    Scientists have created a smartphone-based microscope that could make cancer screening accessible to healthcare workers in the more remote areas of the world.The device is aimed at underdeveloped countries, where doctors don't always have the tools or expertise to conduct DNA sequencing analysis and testing for genetic mutations.
  • 5300c769af79e

    Report: Sony Confirms 'High-End' PS4

    As expected, Sony is developing an upgraded version of its PlayStation 4 console with support for 4K and richer graphics, Sony Interactive Entertainment head Andrew House told the Financial Times.Rumors about a new PS4, codenamed "Neo," began swirling in March when The Wall Street Journal teased a new PlayStation that could more effectively handle virtual reality content.
  • 5300c769af79e

    Google buys Launchpad Toys, a startup with an augmented reality app for kids

    The San Francisco-based startup began in 2010.“I saw the movie Big when I was 8, and I decided I wanted to be Tom Hanks,” Launchpad Toys cofounder Andy Russell told VentureBeat in a 2011 interview.