9 Reasons DevOps Is a Dirty Word

...

Cities are central to our lives. More than half of the global population now lives in and around c

DevOps, which is a massive change for most organizations and requires serious commitment from management and workers, isn't for everyone. But is it really for anyone? Here are nine reasons DevOps might not be right for you and your organization.

Everyone wants to be on the cutting edge of operational productivity. When organizations develop new and better ways of doing things, it's natural for that way to spread throughout the industry. Once in a while, though, the new way of doing things is terrible.

If you want to get a good fistfight started, it's hard to do better than throwing out a challenge to someone's chosen method for developing software and running their IT department. When you can slap someone with a challenge to both of those in one word, then you're setting up a barbed-wire cage match.

[See Agile Vs. DevOps: 10 Ways They're Different.]

DevOps is one of the hottest trends in software development and IT operations. It combines software development, application deployment, and IT operations in a more-or-less seamless stream of IT goodness and bliss. I've written about some keys to successful DevOps and some of the tools that can help you win at DevOps. But there has to be another side to the argument, so I went looking for those who don't like DevOps at all.

While I didn't find a quadrant of the internet crawling with DevOps haters -- this isn't politics, after all -- I did find quite a few people who were skeptics or DevOps antagonists. I combed through many of those blog posts and articles to pull together some of the more common reasons for saying that DevOps is a rotten methodology that no sane organization should attempt.

Here's something to keep in mind: No matter whether you're a DevOps fan or opponent, I haven't run across anyone who says that DevOps should be embraced by absolutely every organization out there. It works well for some, is an uncomfortable fit for others, and would be an utter disaster for a third group. Some of the horror stories come from companies in the third group that have strained mightily to make DevOps work, so keep context in mind.

Having put these anti-DevOps rationales out into the world, I'm curious to hear your take. Have I expressed something that you think but haven't put into writing? Am I preaching to the choir, here? Or is this article proof that I've finally lost my mind? Let me know here or on Twitter, and we'll continue the conversation -- whether or not we continue the move to DevOps.

Categories
APPLICATIONS
0 Comment

Leave a Reply

Captcha image


RELATED BY

  • 5300c769af79e

    Wi-Fi Performance: Determing the Cause of High Retry Percentage

    Download Advances in Wi-Fi technology have made Wi-Fi the preferred access method for everything from social media to business-critical applications.With these advances comes one unfortunate side effect for network engineers: people expect things to work.
  • 5300c769af79e

    YouTube Intros HDR Support, But You'll Need a Compatible Display

    Announced this week, YouTube now supports the uploading of videos in HDR (high dynamic range), bringing a new era of content with higher contrast and vibrant colors.While 4K and HDR is all the rage currently, viewers will need a compatible display/monitor/TV in order to enjoy this upgraded video quality.
  • 5300c769af79e

    Google Fiber CEO Departs After Five Months

    After just five months on the job, Gregory McCray has departed and there’s no replacement currently lined up.In his first address, he mentioned he has a fondness for sailing and that his wife refers to his boat as his “mistress.
  • 5300c769af79e

    iPhone 6s Is Best-Selling Smartphone Worldwide

    The iPhone 7, which Apple will likely launch tomorrow, has a lot to live up to in order to match the sales success of the company's current flagship handset, the iPhone 6s.According to a report from market research firm Strategy Analytics, global iPhone 6s shipments totaled more than 14 million in the second quarter of this year, surpassing its nearest rival, the Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge, by nearly 6 million devices.