Hot potato! How to ditch your Samsung Galaxy Note 7 before it explodes

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Samsung’s Galaxy Note 7 was supposed to be the company’s ultimate triumph. Instead, it became a tragedy. After multiple reports of exploding batteries, a full recall that floundered, and replacement Note 7 handsets that also exploded, it’s time to call it: The Galaxy Note 7 is unsafe. Under absolutely no circumstances should you continue to use your Galaxy Note 7, ask for a replacement Note 7, or buy a new one.

Exploding batteries are no joke — especially when those faulty batteries are inside a device that you hold in your hands, cradle next to your face, and sleep next to at night. The issue is so serious that airlines ban Note 7-carrying passengers from planes and carriers have stopped selling the device.

Although Samsung has halted production and is currently evaluating the situation, it hasn’t officially declared an end to Galaxy Note 7 sales or production.

“We are temporarily adjusting the Galaxy Note 7 production schedule in order to take further steps to ensure quality and safety matters,” Samsung told Digital Trends in a statement.

“We recognize that carrier partners have stopped sales and exchanges of the Galaxy Note 7 in response to reports of heat damage issues, and we respect their decision. We are working diligently with authorities and third-party experts and will share findings when we have completed the investigation,” Samsung added. “Even though there are a limited number of reports, we want to reassure customers that we are taking every report seriously. If we determine a product safety issue exists, Samsung will take immediate steps approved by the CPSC to resolve the situation.”

Here’s how to return your Galaxy Note 7, how to exchange it, and what you should buy instead.

If you bought a Galaxy Note 7 or recently received a replacement Note 7, you should immediately return it and get a replacement device. You can read the full Consumer Product Safety Committee’s report here.

If you bought a Galaxy Note 7, you can:

Each U.S. carrier and retailer offers different options for customers who bought the Note 7. We’ve pulled all the info together here.

Know your rights! If any carrier argues with you about giving a full refund, show them the CPSC’s website. Any vendor of the galaxy Note 7 is legally required to give you either a full refund or exchange it for a device of equal value.

AT&T

The policy: AT&T stopped selling the Galaxy Note 7. “Based on recent reports, we’re no longer exchanging new Note 7s at this time … pending further investigation of these reported incidents,” an AT&T spokesman said. The carrier is encouraging customers with a recalled Note 7 to visit an AT&T location to exchange the device for another Samsung smartphone or smartphone of their choice, and will also refund any Note 7 accessories.

What to do: You can get a Galaxy S7 or S7 Edge. Alternatively, you can exchange your Note 7 for the LG V20 (arriving Oct. 24), iPhone 7 Plus (arriving in November), or LG G5.

Call AT&T at 1-800-331-0500

Verizon

The policy: Verizon has suspended sales of the Galaxy Note 7 pending Samsung’s investigation with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, a representative told Digital Trends. It’s encouraging customers concerned about the safety of their replacement Note 7 smartphones to “take [them] back to the original point of purchase” in exchange for another smartphone. And it’s allowing online Verizon customers to exchange replacement Note 7 units at Verizon stores.

What to do: You can get a Galaxy S7 or S7 Edge. Alternatively, you can exchange your Note 7 for the Google Pixel or Pixel XL (arriving Oct. 20), HTC 10, iPhone 7 Plus (arriving in November), or LG G5.

Call Verizon at 1-800-922-0204

T-Mobile

The policy:  T-Mobile halted sales of the Galaxy Note 7, citing concerns over the smartphone’s safety. “While Samsung investigates multiple reports of issues, T-Mobile is suspending all sales of the new Note 7  and exchanges for replacement Note 7 devices,” a spokesperson for the carrier said. It is waiving restocking fees and providing a full refund to customers who return their device and giving subscribers who return their Note 7 a $25 credit on their monthly bill. In addition, T-Mobile is offering a “complete refund” on Note 7 devices and accessories — specifically, the full amount paid at time of purchase plus any and all associated fees — and letting those who received a free Netflix subscription as a bonus for pre-ordering the Note 7 retain that benefit, if they so choose.

What to do: You can get a Galaxy S7 or S7 Edge. Alternatively, you can exchange your Note 7 for the LG G5, iPhone 7 Plus (arriving in November), or LG V20 (coming soon).

Call T-Mobile at 1-844-275-9309

Sprint

The policy: Sprint suspended Note 7 sales and will allow you to exchange your Note 7 for any other device. The carrier added that it’s working with Samsung to understand the dangers of both the original Note 7 and the new  so-called “safe” units that have since been found exploding. “Given recent issues reported in the media, Sprint is halting sales of replacement Note 7 devices pending the conclusion of the investigation by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission and Samsung,” Sprint told Digital Trends. “If a Sprint customer with a replacement Note 7 has any concerns, we will exchange it for any other device.”

What to do: You can get a Galaxy S7 or S7 Edge. Alternatively, you can exchange your Note 7 for the HTC 10,  iPhone 7 Plus (arriving in November), or LG G5.

Call Sprint at 1-888-211-4727

Samsung

The policy: Samsung’s website offers scant details on what to do if you bought your Note 7 from the company directly online. It simply says to call 1-844-365-6197 for assistance. Some users reported that they were unable to return their Galaxy Note 7 to Samsung by mail as requested due to UPS and FedEx refusing to transport the packages.

What to do: Get that full refund. If you can’t, get a Galaxy S7 Edge.

Call Samsung at 1-844-365-6197

Best Buy

The policy: Best Buy offers full refunds and exchanges on all Note 7 phones and accessories. The retailer is offering the option of a Galaxy S7 or Galaxy S7 Edge as an alternative. Best Buy will also get you a $25 credit from your carrier if you stick with a Samsung Galaxy S7 or S7 Edge. You can also return your Note 7 for a full refund and buy a different phone.

What to do: You can get a Galaxy S7 or S7 Edge. Alternatively, you can exchange your Note 7 for the Google Pixel or Pixel XL (arriving Oct. 20), Huawei Nexus 6P (unlocked), iPhone 7 Plus (arriving in November), Huawei Honor 8 (unlocked), or LG G5 (unlocked).

Call Best Buy at 1-888-237-8289

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