It looks like Microsoft has given up on its Band fitness tracker

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Microsoft has sold out of its Band 2 activity tracker and has no immediate plans to replace it, the company said this week.

The device disappeared from Microsoft’s website on Monday. Later, the computer giant confirmed it was no more, though promised to keep “customer support channels” open.

“We have sold through our existing Band 2 inventory and have no plans to release another Band device this year,” the company said in a statement to ZDNet.

It added that it remained “committed to supporting our Microsoft Band 2 customers through Microsoft Stores and our customer support channels and will continue to invest in the Microsoft Health platform, which is open to all hardware and apps partners across Windows, iOS, and Android devices.”

Rumors surfaced last month that the $250 Band 2 might not receive an update, and as the weeks passed with no sign of an announcement – the Band and Band 2 were released in October 2014 and October 2015 – it seemed increasingly clear that Microsoft had no plans for the device. The Microsoft Band SDK is also no longer available.

However, its statement does in fact leave the door open for a possible Band 3, or more likely a completely fresh design, though any such launch looks to be a ways off.

The company declined to give a specific reason for its decision, though it seems likely the tracker was simply under performing in a highly competitive sector offering plenty of impressive devices.

Related: Our favorite fitness trackers will help coax you off the couch

While the original Band came packed with data-gathering sensors, it was heavily criticized for its sub-par design. The Band 2 was an altogether more attractive device, but according to DT’s review of the updated model it still “collapsed short of the finish line” thanks to inconsistent data and the ease with which it picked up scratches.

The Band 2 is a GPS-enabled water- and dust-resistant tracker with sensors that include an accelerometer, gyro, and barometer. It also incorporates a heart-rate sensor, UV sensor, a VO2 monitor, and sleep-tracking capabilities.

Stats appear on a curved AMOLED display mounted on the silicone band, though a more detailed breakdown and analysis of collected data is offered via the Microsoft Health platform.

It’s possible Microsoft might one day decide to have a go with an all-new fitness tracker, though it looks like we’ll have to wait a while to see what, if anything, comes out of the workshop.

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