Prisma for iOS Now Works Offline

...

A month after launching on the Android platform, the popular photo-altering app is now available for use without an Internet connection.

Prisma promised offline "repainting" times of about five seconds for iPhone 6s and 6s Plus owners; the process takes a little longer for the iPhone 6, but shouldn't cause excess stress on the handset's battery.

The initial update, according to The Verge, will not include all the AI-based app's filters, but should hit Android as early as next week.

Prisma did not immediately respond to PCMag's request for comment.

Prisma, which transforms images into works of digital art using styles of famous artists, arrived on iOS in June, boasting deep-learning algorithms that contort pictures into the patterns of Edvard Munch, Roy Lichtenstein, Piet Mondrian, Hokusai (pictured), and more. Like Instagram, users can snap a new photo or choose an existing one and apply a filter. Slide your finger left or right over the image to increase or lessen the effect, then share the final product to social media sites or simply save it to your phone.

The Moscow-based company this week also introduced charity styles, allowing folks to donate $1 to "make children with serious illnesses smile."

For more, see PCMag's reviews of Prisma for iPhone and Android.

Categories
APPLICATIONS
0 Comment

Leave a Reply

Captcha image


RELATED BY

  • 5300c769af79e

    Video: Hands-on and Overview of Moto Mods

    Announced alongside the new smartphones from Moto and Lenovo, the Moto Mods are an attempt to bring modularity to the forefront of consumer smartphones.Featuring everything from a projector module, to Style Shells and JBL external speakers, Moto showcased an impressive number of Moto Mods that customers will be able to purchase with their Moto Z and Moto Z Force devices.
  • 5300c769af79e

    To SIEM or not to SIEM

    When implemented well, SIEM (Security Information and Event Management) is a great tool that can protect your information and keep your business secure.But there's a catch: managing a SIEM is akin to riding a bike uphill.
  • 5300c769af79e

    Using a cell phone jammer has just cost this guy $48,000

    A Florida man who used a signal jammer during commutes in an effort to stop drivers using their handsets has this week been hit with a $48,000 fine by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).Considered a threat to public safety for their potential to hamper the work of emergency response teams, the devices are illegal to own and use.
  • 5300c769af79e

    Apple Gave Up User Data In 82% Of Feds' Requests

    31, fulfilling 82% of US authorities' 1,015 requests to access user accounts, Apple stated in its report.Most of these requests center on lost or stolen Apple devices, with authorities requesting customer contact information that is used to register an Apple device.