Want to learn to code? These 5 apps make it easy

...

SoloLearn Learn series

This one isn’t an app — it’s a series of apps, each one designed for a specific coding language. The apps are highly rated in the Google Play and App Store, namely because they’re dynamic, interactive, and offer a great way to learn the basics of coding. Perhaps the only problem with the apps is that you’ll have to have an objective in mind for what you want to learn. If you want to learn how to build web pages, for example, you’ll probably want to start with HTML and CSS apps. If you want to build an Android app, then you’ll want to learn Java.

The app follows a kind of lesson plan, complete with quizzes and checkpoints. You’ll get a score after completing each section, which is designed to motivate you to redo sections in which you didn’t get a perfect score. There’s even an online leaderboard where users from around the globe post their scores, thus adding a bit of competition to the mix. The best thing about SoloLearn? The apps are all completely free!

Udacity (free, or $200 a month with certification)

udacity

If you’re really looking to kick things up a notch, you might want to take a nanodegree from Udacity. Udacity actually offers its nanodegrees in hundreds of different topics, so you won’t have to stick exclusively to coding if you don’t want to. Udacity claims its services are better than the rest because it develops the courses in partnership with corporations like Google. While some of the courses on Udacity are free, you’re really going to have to pay to get the most out of the service. The premium courses offer feedback from professionals and allow you to make connections with your fellow students, creating a sense of community.

Speaking of money, the service certainly isn’t cheap. To take the nanodegree, you’ll be paying $200 per month. However, while the nanodegrees start at a certain time, you can finish them as quickly or as slowly as you want. Devote enough time to it, and you may only have to pay for a few months. The cost could be worth it if you’re using this as a way to find a job in programming, as some of the nanodegrees offer the prospect of jobs at companies like AT&T upon completion.

So, what do you get for free? You can still peruse the content on the service, though you won’t get verified certification, professional feedback, or coaching.

Tynker

tynker

While you need to be pretty serious about learning to use Udacity, the same can’t be said of Tynker. The service does away with the mobile courses in favor of a game, one aimed at helping kids learn how to code. The interface is based on a simple drag-and-drop concept, and if the player doesn’t complete a level, instructions on how they can improve will appear and they’ll be given the chance to replay the round. The interface makes the concept of programming a lot easier to understand, too, and while it won’t allow your kids to build complete apps, it does introduce the basics of coding and give them a foundation to build on.

The app isn’t for the super young, however. Kids need to be able to read, and unless they use a parent’s device, they’ll need to own a smartphone or tablet.

Encode

encode

Encode may look basic, but it provides an in-depth look at coding. One of the great things about Encode is that it starts from the beginning and offers different concepts in bite-sized chunks, so even if you only have a few minutes to spare, you can go over a section within the app. Only after going over basic concepts does it introduce more advanced concepts, such as coding using languages like JavaScript. The lessons are also interactive and the app offers feedback after each lesson, ensuring you’ll have a chance to rehash lessons if you don’t initially grasp the concepts. Unfortunately for iOS users, Encode is only available for Android.

Khan Academy

khan-academy

Ah, the classic Khan Academy. Khan Academy has become an extremely popular way to learn different things on your phone or tablet, however, unlike services like Udacity, Khan Academy is free. It also offers lessons on far more than just coding, so if you’re looking for an app to learn all sorts of interesting things, look no further.

Perhaps the only downside to this is that courses are user-created, so they might not adhere to the same level of quality as other apps. Still, the app has courses for most major coding languages, including an “Intro to HTML/CSS: Making webpages” course and an “Intro to JS: Drawing and Animation” course. In other words, if you have a specific goal in mind, like learning how to build web pages, Khan Academy could prove incredibly helpful.

Categories
APPLICATIONS
0 Comment

Leave a Reply

Captcha image


RELATED BY

  • 5300c769af79e

    Samsung Pay V2.3 Update Adds Iris Scanning, Card Restoring

    In the update, Samsung says that the mobile payment system now supports “more of your favorite gift cards” and membership cards, restores those cards when you sign back in to Samsung Pay, and supports “iris based authentication” on supported phones.There is a single phone with an iris scanner at the moment, the Galaxy Note 7, so should you find yourself in the possession of the non-exploding variety, give the iris scanning a go!
  • 5300c769af79e

    T-Mobile Might be Testing RCS Inside Google Messenger

    According to a number of reddit users and a tweet we have received, T-Mobile appears to be testing RCS (Rich Communication Services) inside of the Google Messenger app with those who signed up with DIGITS.To sum up the latest development, though, a small number of folks who enrolled in that service are seeing a RCS option pop up in Google’s Messenger app.
  • 5300c769af79e

    Verizon's Galaxy S5 is Getting Marshmallow Today

    Late Friday afternoon, Verizon updated its Galaxy S5 software support page with today’s date, a sign that an update would be arriving.Then, this morning, they included update details, confirming our suspicions – this is Marshmallow.
  • 5300c769af79e

    Google Pixel / Pixel XL Camera Review

    At the unveiling of the Google Pixel and Pixel XL, Google couldn’t help but brag about the 12.Is this the best smartphone camera ever in a smartphone as some of its early reviews suggest?