This Kevlar iPhone cable is supposed to survive anything … so we blew it up

...

For the past few weeks, a company by the name of Zus has been generating quite a lot of buzz with its innovative new product: the Zus Kevlar cable. Unlike most charging cables, which tend to fray or break after a few months of rough use, the Zus Kevlar is designed to withstand a ridiculous amount of abuse.

As its name suggests, the cable is reinforced with a special blend of Kevlar — which supposedly that makes it five times stronger than steel. To demonstrate this, Zus actually used the cable to tow a small car — but even after seeing the impressive demo, we wanted to put it to the test and see for ourselves. How much abuse can this cable really take? Check out the video to find out.

Categories
APPLICATIONS
0 Comment

Leave a Reply

Captcha image


RELATED BY

  • 5300c769af79e

    Tim Cook Talks Artificial Intelligence, iPhone's Future

    Secure software development doesn't need to be a conflict between pushy security teams and resista Marking the five-year point as the head of Apple, CEO Tim Cook spoke to the Washington Post about tax policy, the future of smartphones, and how the company plans to integrate artificial intelligence with its future projects.In the interview, Cook dismissed the idea of the iPhone accounting for two-thirds of Apple's revenues being problematic, calling the smartphone's dominance a privilege and expressing his belief that one day, every person on earth will own a smartphone.
  • 5300c769af79e

    Video: Hands-on and Overview of Moto Mods

    Announced alongside the new smartphones from Moto and Lenovo, the Moto Mods are an attempt to bring modularity to the forefront of consumer smartphones.Featuring everything from a projector module, to Style Shells and JBL external speakers, Moto showcased an impressive number of Moto Mods that customers will be able to purchase with their Moto Z and Moto Z Force devices.
  • 5300c769af79e

    Using a cell phone jammer has just cost this guy $48,000

    A Florida man who used a signal jammer during commutes in an effort to stop drivers using their handsets has this week been hit with a $48,000 fine by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).Considered a threat to public safety for their potential to hamper the work of emergency response teams, the devices are illegal to own and use.
  • 5300c769af79e

    Apple Gave Up User Data In 82% Of Feds' Requests

    31, fulfilling 82% of US authorities' 1,015 requests to access user accounts, Apple stated in its report.Most of these requests center on lost or stolen Apple devices, with authorities requesting customer contact information that is used to register an Apple device.