Understand languages you’ve never learned with the Pilot translation earpiece

...

If you’ve been exposed to even a small dose of science fiction over the years, you’ve probably encountered at least one type of device that allows language barriers to be completely bypassed. From The Last Starfighter to Star Trek, there’s a reason this is a common trope — the idea of being able to understand anyone no matter the language is a fascinating one. Now a New York City-based company by the name of Waverly Labs is looking to make this fantasy a reality.

Google Translate and its ilk do a fine job, but with Waverly’s new Pilot wearable, the company claims to make translation effortless and instantaneous. The Pilot is a simple earpiece that, after just a slight pause, allows the wearer to hear a basic translation of multiple languages into their native tongue. It’s designed for the international traveller, but its talents could give way to a cornucopia of potential applications.

Related: Snap pictures of a document and translate them with Xerox’s translation app

One of the key features of the Pilot is that Waverly Labs intends to make it function completely offline. A companion mobile app is used to download language packs and toggle the language within the earpiece, and also functions as the “brains,” but translation doesn’t rely on an internet connection to work. The Pilot’s second earpiece can even connect to its companion for music playback when the translation function is not in use.

According to the company’s website, the Pilot will ship with support for select languages out of the box, with other languages available via downloadable packs for a separate fee. Initially, European Romance and Germanic languages will be supported, which would indicate Spanish and French (specifically indicated by Waverly), as well as Italian, English, and possibly German. The product is still in its nascent stages, however, so we’ll have to wait for more specifics there. Among other language additions mentioned on the Waverly Labs website are Slavic, Semitic, Hindi and East Asian. In the company’s low-res promo video, we can see creator Andrew Ochoa speaking with a friend in French/English.

If you’re looking to try out the Pilot in person, you’ll have to be patient. Waverly Labs intends to launch a pre-order campaign for the Pilot on Indiegogo starting May 25, with the wearable selling for $300 — not including Early Bird pricing. Even if the campaign is successful, however, the Pilot isn’t planned to ship until the spring of 2017, assuming there are no delays along the way.

Related: Google Search now automatically translates (some) foreign words into English

Fortunately, there will be a way to at least get an idea of how the Pilot will work. The company is planning to release a mobile app this summer, which Waverly Labs says will function as a “phrasebook” for travelers. The company says this will be included in the pre-order for the Pilot earpiece, but hasn’t yet said if it will be available separately.

As always with crowdfunded projects, we’ll have to wait for the final product to hit our hands (and ears) before we can fully endorse Waverly’s big idea. But if the Pilot works as planned, it could be a serious game changer in the realm of modern, real-time communication — no strings attached.

Categories
APPLICATIONS
0 Comment

Leave a Reply

Captcha image


RELATED BY

  • 5300c769af79e

    New Tech Promises Longer-Lasting Batteries

    If there is one thing that is on every smartphone owner's wish list, it's a longer-lasting battery.The 4-year-old firm developed a rechargeable lithium metal battery, which it claims can double the energy capacity of a regular lithium ion battery found in most modern gadgets.
  • 5300c769af79e

    AWS Enjoys Top Perch in IaaS, PaaS Markets

    The other three major competitors -- Salesforce, Rackspace and IBM -- have slightly more market share when combined.After 10 years in the market, Amazon has assembled more than 1 million customers in 190 countries around the world.
  • 5300c769af79e

    Awesome Tech You Can’t Buy Yet: 3D printed violins, biometric wallets, and more

    3DVarius — 3D printed electric violin At this point, its no secret that you can 3D print just about anything.Based on the specs listed on the Kickstarter page, it looks like 101Hero might actually make a worthy competitor to a few printers that are 10 times as expensive.
  • 5300c769af79e

    Addressing Mobile App Risk: Why Network Traffic Analysis Isn't Enough

    Download Appthority's White Paper, Addressing Mobile App Risk: Why Network Traffic Analysis Isn't Enough identifies key factors that illustrate why enterprises need to go beyond network perimeter security to incorporate mobile security.Forward thinking CISOs and their teams are realizing that, as mobile is increasingly the way we work and play, having a mobile security strategy is as necessary as simply having a security strategy.